The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Unseen Guest

by Maryrose Wood

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place and the Unseen Guest by Maryrose Wood

I’ve said it before, and I will say it again. These books are charming. I am really looking forward to reading them to my kids in a few years. One thing I enjoy about these books is that there is an underlying mystery that prevails through each book and the reader gets little bits and pieces each time. The reader gets just enough information to start making speculations that are either confirmed or debunked in subsequent books. Read More »

I Will Lead You Along: The Life of Henry B. Eyring

by Robert I. Eaton and Henry J. Eyring

I Will Lead You Along: The Life of Henry B. Eyring by Robert Eaton and Henry Eyring

I always hesitate when I review religious books about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons). It is difficult for me to separate my own religious beliefs and examine a text as a purely impartial reader. For example, as a member of the LDS church I read church texts and the scriptural cannon (Old Testament, New Testament King James’ Version, The Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, Pearl of Great Price) weekly, but I never review them as I consider them sacred. Read More »

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and The History of the World

by Sam Kean

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements by Sam Kean

This is the second of Kean’s scientific narratives that I have read, and the first that he had published. Though I liked it less than The Violinists Thumb, it was still interesting and informative. Read More »

The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Prisoner’s Dilemma

by Trenton Lee Stewart

The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Prisoner's Dilemma by Trenton Lee Stewart

The third installment in The Mysterious Benedict Society is every bit as fun, action-packed, and refreshing as the previous books in the series. I feel like I gush when I write about these books, but they are genuinely wonderful. Stewart’s style is both light and captivating. I find myself cheering audibly for our heroes and cringing whenever the villains get a leg up. I assure you, it is quite amusing to watch. Read More »

Speaking From Among the Bones

by Alan Bradley

Speaking from Among the Bones by Alan Bradley

I truly enjoy reading Flavia de Luce novels. I can’t help it. Bradley manages to capture perfectly inconsistencies that radiate from 11/12 year old girls. He also captures a time that I find fascinating in English history.

Read More »

Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-first-century Parenthood

by Drew Magary

Someone Could Get Hurt by Drew Magary

I’m a parent. I wasn’t always a parent. I find it hard, now, to remember what my life was like before I had all these irrational fears and before I spent my days worrying about things like potty training progress or which educational school of thought best fits my ideal of the type of people I would like to release into the world. Read More »

The Violinist’s Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code

by Sam Kean

The Violinists Thumb by Sam Kean

I first heard about this book on Radiolab, and yes, I immediately like most of what I hear about on Radiolab. Now, I am not fascinated by scientific details, generally speaking, so I probably would not have selected this book had I not heard some excerpts beforehand and that would have been a shame because this book was GREAT! Read More »

The Oxford Book of Modern Women’s Stories

edited by Patricia Craig

I was skeptical when I initially got this for my birthday. What constitutes a Modern Women’s Story anyway? Happily, Patricia Craig explains what does it for her, and since she is the editor, thats what made it into the book. Read More »

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Olympics

by Daniel James Brown

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

Fun fact about me, one of my life’s goals is to go to a regatta. In my mind it would have been on the Thames, but now I have a new regatta in mind, all thanks to The Boys in the Boat. Read More »

T is for Trespass

by Sue Grafton

T is for Trespass by Sue Grafton

This is my favorite Kinsey Millhone novel thus far. At first, I was a bit thrown off by the narrative. Grafton switches back and forth between Kinsey and a sociopath that she is dealing with, Solana Rojas (alias). I haven’t known Grafton to do that before, but it made the narrative a bit more eerie which I found interesting. Read More »

One for the Money

by Janet Evanovich

One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

I have a friend, who we’ll call Andrew (that is his name, by the way), who reads a lot of books. I told him that I’d been reading the Alphabet Murder books by Sue Grafton as my ‘bubble gum’ reads. He confessed that he likes to read the Stephanie Plum ‘number books’ for his bubble gum reading. Read More »

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

by Ishmael Beah

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Soldier Boy by Ishmael Beah

One can’t review this book, without talking about the controversy surrounding this story. Read More »

J is for Judgment

by Sue Grafton

J is for Judgement by Sue Grafton

I liked this one. The plot seems a bit more complex than other Grafton novels, so that was nice. Also, I know I should always put the disclaimer in here, that I am not reading these in the order they were written, but rather the order that they come into my possession, and this came via a birthday gift from a used bookstore. Read More »

H is for Homicide

by Sue Grafton

H is for Homicide by Sue Grafton

Yet another piece of the alphabet murder books puzzle. These are so easy to read and have really taken over most of my bubble gum reading these past months. Read More »

G is for Gumshoe

by Sue Grafton

G is for Gumshoe by Sue Grafton

Another Sue Grafton. Yes. Out of order… I know. Read More »

Great Tales from English History: The Truth About King Arthur, Lady Godiva, Richard the Lionheart, and more

by Robert Lacey

Great Tales from English History by Robert Lacey

I like history, but I am unsure about where this book falls into the historical non fiction category. Lacey covers a lot of events, in chronological order, but does not delve deeply into cause, morality, or effect, of many of the events. Read More »

One Child

by Torey L. Hayden

One Child by Torey Hayden

I have to ask, did they not have HIPAA when Hayden was teaching school? No, research (okay, wikipedia) informs me Bill Clinton signed this bad boy into law in 1996. Read More »

O is for Outlaw

by Sue Grafton

O is for Outlaw by Sue Grafton

Yes, I am aware that these reviews are woefully out of order. But what was I to do when I found O is for Outlaw at our little free library, what could I do? Read More »

R is for Ricochet

by Sue Grafton

R is for Ricochet by Sue Grafton

Another Kinsey Millhone alphabet mystery. I feel like I enjoy these more the more I read them, but they are very simple literary efforts. I don’t like to read reviews of the books I’ve read before I read them, but somehow I stumbled into some reviews for the later alphabet books by purist fans. They seem to be all up in arms as to the direction Kinsey’s character is going. Read More »

The Alloy of Law

by Brandon Sanderson

The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson

I don’t read a lot of fantasy written for adults. I did; however, really enjoy the Mistborn series. I was intrigued by Sanderson’s idea to write a novel where we actually see a fantasy world that has progressed and we see how technology is used within the framework of magic. Read More »

Q is for Quarry

by Sue Grafton

Q is for Quarry by Sue Grafton

This has been my favorite of the Kinsey Millhone series. I’m not sure if it was the mystery itself I found more compelling, or if I just enjoyed finding out more about Kinsey’s parents, but I burned through this one and felt very satisfied at the end.

Read More »

Trails to Testimony: Bringing Young Men to Christ Through Scouting

by Bradley D. Harris

Trails to Testimony by Bradley D. Harris

My husband suggested I read this book, as he was required to read it since he volunteers in the good ole BSA. He works with the Varsity boys (ages 14-16) and oh the stories he could tell! Read More »

P is for Peril

by Sue Grafton

P is for Peril by Sue Grafton

Kinsey Millhone, lady PI, is back.  And yes, I am aware that I have not yet read O is for Outlaw because I don’t own it and I don’t think it is important enough to go hunt it down in a library. Read More »

Lay the Favorite: A Memoir of Gambling

by Beth Raymer

Lay the Favorite: A Memoir of Gambling by Beth Raymer

While I was reading this book, I was unsure of whether I liked it or not, and after I finished, I decided I did. Read More »

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery

by Maryrose Wood

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood

I’d been looking forward to reading the second installment of The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place. It didn’t disappoint. Read More »

The Second World War

by John Keegan

The Second World War by John Keegan

Yet another WWII book. I know I promised there would be less of these in the future, but my husband bought this one and it has been staring at me from the bookshelves for nearly two years.  Read More »

The Complete Book of Running for Women: Everything You Need to Know About Training, Nutrition, Injury Prevention, Motivation, Racing, and Much, Much More

by Claire Kowalchik

The Complete Book of Running for Women by Claire Kowalchik

Okay. The title is pretentious. Lets just get that out of the way now, shall we? Aside from the title, I find it very hard to review self help books. Do I look at it purely as a literary endeavor? Do I actually judge whether the ‘help’ is helpful? Read More »

They Call Me Baba Booey

by Gary Dell’Abate with Chad Millman

They Call Me Baba Booey by Gary Dell'Abate with Chad Millman

I don’t listen to Howard Stern. Ever. So I had no idea who this guy was, but as with every free book, I gave this one a chance. I am glad I did. I feared that I would dislike it as much as the other biographies that came as a result of the library fairy, but to my pleasant surprise, this was oddly uplifting.

Read More »

The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon

by David Grann

The Lost City of Z by David Grann

I don’t think I am ever going to get tired of books about Percy Fawcett. An explorer who got lost in the Amazon in search of a lost city? A mystery? Theories upon theories? And David Grann believes he has solved the mystery. Read More »

N Is for Noose

by Sue Grafton

N is for Noose by Sue Grafton

Full Disclosure: I’ve never read any other Kinsey Millhone mysteries. My husband’s Grandma was trimming her library and apparently decided to get rid of N on down to V, and since I never turn down a free book… I’ll be reviewing more from this series in the future. Full Disclosure Part Two: I think Tana French’s writing has ruined me for all mystery novels. So my review will be jaded by that high standard. Read More »