In Patagonia

by Bruce Chatwin

A little back ground is in order. I am actually half Chilean, and have spent a little time there over the years. I also lived for a while in Brazil. This helped me in my pursuit of a second major field of study at university. Yes, one major was not enough. I double majored in Political Science and Latin American Studies. As a result I feel fairly confident in my knowledge of Latin American history, culture, politics and religion. So when my uncle (also an avid reader of anything he can get his hands on) lent me his battered copy of In Patagonia, I was excited to see what Mr. Chatwin would have in store. Read More »

Under the Covers and Between the Sheets

by C. Alan Joyce and Sarah Janssen

I had high hopes for this book. High hopes that were not met. Don’t get me wrong, the facts were interesting and a few of the anecdotes amusing, the problem is that the audience of this book is going to be book lovers, avid book readers. And avid book readers are going to already know everything in this book. Read More »

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher: A Political Marriage

by Nicholas Wapshott

One thing you mus know about me before I continue…  I LOVE Ronald Reagan. In the early 80s, I was an elementary school kid. President Reagan fascinated me then, and he fascinates me still. My husband has even expressed relief that Ronald and I were born decades apart because I would have married President Reagan if given the chance. As a self proclaimed Reagan devote, I’ve read a book or two about Reagan in my day. Read More »

Uncivil Wars

by Thomas A. Hollihan

Once upon a time I majored in Political Science, that was a long time ago, but might explain my reasons for reading Uncivil Wars by Thomas A. Hollian. This used but unloved manuscript came into my life via a sibling who was getting rid of ‘junk’ before a move to Peru. Read More »

Lions of Medina: The Marines of Charlie Company and Their Brotherhood of Valor

by Doyle D. Glass

I tried, and I tried, and I tried to determine what special interest, authority, or expertise prompted Mr. Glass to write about the soldiers of Vietnam, and I could find none. Glass’s lack of scope made the book disjointed. Glass’s self stated reason for writing about the men of Medina (other than it would have a less competitive market than a WWII book) was to give credit to the soldiers of Vietnam to whom history has given very little. Read More »

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession

by Allison Hoover Bartlett

I loved this book. There, I said it. I don’t need to say it again even though I feel compelled to. Rarely do I feel comfortable paying full price at Border’s for a new book, when I always suspect that book will go on sale in a month or a few weeks. Read More »

Dear Undercover Economist: Priceless Advice on Money, Work, Sex, Kids, and Life’s Other Challenges

by Tim Harford

For a few semesters of my university career, I toyed with the idea of getting a minor in Economics. I enjoy economic theory and had done well in the subject. I abandoned economics and did not regret that decision when I later took Econ 451: Economic Trade Theory. Read More »