T is for Trespass

by Sue Grafton

T is for Trespass by Sue Grafton

This is my favorite Kinsey Millhone novel thus far. At first, I was a bit thrown off by the narrative. Grafton switches back and forth between Kinsey and a sociopath that she is dealing with, Solana Rojas (alias). I haven’t known Grafton to do that before, but it made the narrative a bit more eerie which I found interesting. Read More »

One for the Money

by Janet Evanovich

One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

I have a friend, who we’ll call Andrew (that is his name, by the way), who reads a lot of books. I told him that I’d been reading the Alphabet Murder books by Sue Grafton as my ‘bubble gum’ reads. He confessed that he likes to read the Stephanie Plum ‘number books’ for his bubble gum reading. Read More »

A Nasty Piece of Work

by Robert Littell

A Nasty Piece of Work by Robert Littell

I enjoy a good mystery, so I was excited to receive Littell’s novel for Christmas, my excitement faded when I delved in and discovered that, despite success writing stories about the CIA, A Nasty Piece of Work was rife with cliche. Read More »

The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

I often re-read books that I love, but I rarely re-read them so quickly in succession. I finished this, and promptly started reading it the next week aloud, to my husband. I appreciated the opportunity for that second read. Read More »

The Dead Fish Museum: Stories

by Charles D’Ambrosio

The Dead Fish Museum by Charles D'Ambrosio

Ah, the world of short stories. The art of a short story is a difficult one. The author needs to create emotional impact and create interest in a location or character in a short amount of time. Story arcs must move more quickly which is a bit of a challenge. Read More »

Tell the Wolves I’m Home

by Carol Rifka Brunt

Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

Gag. I feel like Brunt tried to create a modern day To Kill a Mockingbird. Sadly, it just came off as a bit weird. The book starts with June Elbus recounting sitting for a portrait with her sister. Her uncle is a famous painter who happens to be dying of Aids. So a barrel of laughs, right from the beginning. Read More »

J is for Judgment

by Sue Grafton

J is for Judgement by Sue Grafton

I liked this one. The plot seems a bit more complex than other Grafton novels, so that was nice. Also, I know I should always put the disclaimer in here, that I am not reading these in the order they were written, but rather the order that they come into my possession, and this came via a birthday gift from a used bookstore. Read More »

H is for Homicide

by Sue Grafton

H is for Homicide by Sue Grafton

Yet another piece of the alphabet murder books puzzle. These are so easy to read and have really taken over most of my bubble gum reading these past months. Read More »

G is for Gumshoe

by Sue Grafton

G is for Gumshoe by Sue Grafton

Another Sue Grafton. Yes. Out of order… I know. Read More »

Fablehaven: Keys to the Demon Prison

by Brandon Mull

Fablehaven: Keys to the Demon Prison by Brandon Mull

I have finally finished the series! I’ve had the book for a long time, and to be honest, the only reason I decided to read it at this particular moment is that the book takes up quite a bit of space, and I am trying to consolidate that shelf to make room for my anticipated Christmas books! That pretty much sums up my feelings of the entire Fablehaven series. Read More »

We, the Drowned

by Carsten Jensen

We the Drowned by Carsten Jensen

I LOVED this book! Loved it. I struggle to find non genre (lit fiction) fiction that is good. Much of it is broody, and depressing, and overly self-conscious. Most are trying to sell a message, and though they try to be subtle, I generally find it distasteful. We, the Drowned was fiction done right. Read More »

Road Dogs

by Elmore Leonard

Road Dogs by Elmore Leonard

This was the first book of Leonard’s that I have ever read, and most likely the last. I enjoy crime books, but not necessarily criminal books. Do you see the distinction? Read More »

The Wednesday Letters

by Jason F. Wright

The Wednesday Letters by Jason F. Wright

Confession time, my husband likes yard sales. I really don’t like them, but whenever he goes I tell him to pick me up some books. Sometimes he hits, and sometimes he misses, but I appreciate new books no matter where they come from, or how they turn out. The Wednesday Letters was a miss. Read More »

The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunnits

edited by Mike Ashley

The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunnits by Mike Ashley

Full disclosure, historical fiction is high on the list of things I avoid reading. No judgments against those who enjoy it, I just find it a bit silly, trying to force the characters into unlikely scenarios that inevitably are interesting historical events. For this, and many other reasons I’ll enumerate later on, I REALLY disliked The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunnits. Read More »

O is for Outlaw

by Sue Grafton

O is for Outlaw by Sue Grafton

Yes, I am aware that these reviews are woefully out of order. But what was I to do when I found O is for Outlaw at our little free library, what could I do? Read More »

R is for Ricochet

by Sue Grafton

R is for Ricochet by Sue Grafton

Another Kinsey Millhone alphabet mystery. I feel like I enjoy these more the more I read them, but they are very simple literary efforts. I don’t like to read reviews of the books I’ve read before I read them, but somehow I stumbled into some reviews for the later alphabet books by purist fans. They seem to be all up in arms as to the direction Kinsey’s character is going. Read More »

The Alloy of Law

by Brandon Sanderson

The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson

I don’t read a lot of fantasy written for adults. I did; however, really enjoy the Mistborn series. I was intrigued by Sanderson’s idea to write a novel where we actually see a fantasy world that has progressed and we see how technology is used within the framework of magic. Read More »

Q is for Quarry

by Sue Grafton

Q is for Quarry by Sue Grafton

This has been my favorite of the Kinsey Millhone series. I’m not sure if it was the mystery itself I found more compelling, or if I just enjoyed finding out more about Kinsey’s parents, but I burned through this one and felt very satisfied at the end.

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My New American Life

by Francine Prose

My New American Life by Francine Prose

Meh. My New American Life was okay, but not terribly exciting. I did have a chuckle at the back jacket reviews because they call Prose’s ‘social satire’ brilliant. I’ll be the judge of that, because I rarely find social satire brilliant, unless it is written by Stella Gibbons or Jasper Fforde. Read More »

P is for Peril

by Sue Grafton

P is for Peril by Sue Grafton

Kinsey Millhone, lady PI, is back.  And yes, I am aware that I have not yet read O is for Outlaw because I don’t own it and I don’t think it is important enough to go hunt it down in a library. Read More »

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery

by Maryrose Wood

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place: The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood

I’d been looking forward to reading the second installment of The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place. It didn’t disappoint. Read More »

N Is for Noose

by Sue Grafton

N is for Noose by Sue Grafton

Full Disclosure: I’ve never read any other Kinsey Millhone mysteries. My husband’s Grandma was trimming her library and apparently decided to get rid of N on down to V, and since I never turn down a free book… I’ll be reviewing more from this series in the future. Full Disclosure Part Two: I think Tana French’s writing has ruined me for all mystery novels. So my review will be jaded by that high standard. Read More »

Louisa May Alcott: An Intimate Anthology

by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott: An Intimate Anthology by Lousia May Alcott

Any little girl who ever loved to read and write (guilty!) imagined that they were Jo March. I remember the first time I read Little Women in third grade. I really felt that Louisa May Alcott was the greatest writer on earth. I still re-read the Little Men/Little Women/Jo’s Boys books every couple of years. Read More »

La’s Orchestra Saves the World

by Alexander McCall Smith

La's Orchestra Saves the World by Alexander McCall Smith

I adore Alenxander McCall Smith. Really. Adore him. When I lived in Scotland I shelled out a pretty penny, or pence, to hear him speak. He was charming. His books can be described as charming. La’s Orchestra… a mix of charming and melancholy, which is a mix I can get behind. Read More »

I Am Half-Sick of Shadows

by Alan Bradley

I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley

Flavia de Luce is back in action. I’ve actually owned this book for a year (exactly) but I saved it to read during the Christmas season. Read More »

Broken Harbor

by Tana French

Broken Harbor by Tana French

Tana French has done it again. Or rather, she’s done it as well as she did the first time around with In The Woods.
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The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

by Catherynne M. Valente

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente

This book gets the highest grade possible because it was awesome. You should read it. The end… Read More »

American Adulterer: A Novel

by Jed Mercurio

American Adulterer: A Novel by Jed Mercurio

I hated this book. That is all you should really know, but let me go into the details. This “novel” details the life of JFK beginning with his Inauguration as President of the United States until his assassination. Mercurio calls it a novel in order to not do the due diligence type of research that a non fiction book of the same topic would require. Read More »

The Sense of an Ending

by Julian Barnes

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

I approach winners of the Man Booker Prize with caution, having been lead astray down that path ONE two many times. Read More »

Death in the Andes

by Mario Vargas Llosa

Death in the Andes by Mario Llosa

Confession,  I bought this book because my sister-in-law is Peruvian, and the author is a Nobel Prize Winner from Peru. Other than that, meh, I wasn’t sure what it would have in store for me. We all know my reluctance to read books by Nobel Laureates. Or perhaps you don’t. In that case, I generally find books written by Nobel Prize winners to be pretentious and not that great. There are a few exceptions, but this wasn’t one of them. Read More »